King Charles’ new monogram unveiled.

King Charles’ new monogram unveiled.

The new monogram to be used by Charles as the UK’s new monarch has been unveiled and used for the first time on Tuesday, as the royal family’s mourning period for Queen Elizabeth II comes to an end. King Charles III’s new cypher is designed by the College of Arms and shows his initial – C – intertwined with the letter R for Rex, which is Latin for King, and III is marked within the letter R with the imperial crown above the letters. The all-in-gold royal monogram will be added to various public offices, papers, and street furniture across the UK over the coming months and years, replacing the Queen’s cypher E II R. The Court Post Office at Buckingham Palace became the first to make a frank or stamp post using the new cypher. The new monarch’s monogram is intended for government buildings, state documents and some post boxes, with the decision to change the use of cyphers from the Queen to the King. The process is expected to be a gradual one and the cypher of a previous monarch can stay in use for many years, just as those of Queen Victoria, Edward VII, George V and VI are still to be found on some post boxes in the UK. The UK Cabinet Office said that Where changes can be made easily, such as digital branding, they can be made immediately and physical items such as signage or stationery will be replaced gradually over time as the need arises. That new portrait, replacing that of the late Queen, is expected to be revealed by the end of this year. The UK’s Royal Mint will also produce new coins “in line with demand from banks and post offices” and that image is also yet to be unveiled. The Royal Mail says new stamps featuring King Charles III will enter circulation once the current stocks of stamps are exhausted. According to the Royal Mint Museum, the tradition is for the profile of a new monarch on coins to face in the opposite direction to their predecessor. Meanwhile, existing banknotes and coins will continue to be the valid currency, with Charles and Elizabeth’s notes and coins being used alongside each other.